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View Full Version : Security and Handcuffs


__FutureCop__
01-25-10, 03:18 AM
Hello
I work Overnight security at a hotel and I have a pair of handcuffs.
I am aware that the label security guard does not give me more authority then any other citizen.
What situation is it okay to use them?

Is public intoxication warranted?


Citicop
01-25-10, 03:26 AM
Every state has different rules about what security guards can and cannot do. Then there may be further restrictions put in place by your employer.

Did you not have to take a class to become a security guard? What did they tell you there?

Do you have a Boss you could ask?

-Citicop.

__FutureCop__
01-25-10, 03:37 AM
Did you not have to take a class to become a security guard? What did they tell you there?I took a 8 hour and then a 4 hour, they didn't really mention anything besides we have the same authority as a regular citizen

Do you have a Boss you could ask?I did ask him, he doesn't know


My main concern more is along the lines of being charged with assault (if its possible). So I probably should just look into what NY states citizens arrest laws are thanks for your reply


Citicop
01-25-10, 03:43 AM
No problem. Give it a few hours and I'm sure that someone with specific knowledge of NY law will be along to help further.

-Citicop.

DeltaV
01-25-10, 04:29 AM
Did your employer give you the handcuffs or did you buy them and just decide to carry them? If they gave them to you tell them that you want to be trained not only in how to use them, but when to use them.

Understand that if you improperly use those handcuffs you'll probably be fired. You can also be subject to arrest and/or a civil suit if you handcuff someone improperly, however getting fired is more of a real possibility. Getting fired isn't going to look good on your resume when you apply to police departments.

__FutureCop__
01-25-10, 04:45 AM
Did your employer give you the handcuffs or did you buy them and just decide to carry them?

They did not issue them to me, but i did clear it with them on whether or not I was allowed by the company to carry them.



Getting fired isn't going to look good on your resume when you apply to police departments.

I agree.

There has been I few instances where i thought i may be able to use them, but refrained due to level of knowledge.
I mean there are clear cut cases whereas physical assault, but so far all i have encountered was verbal.
another situation was someone smoking weed in the bathroom, would that be grounds for detaining someone? (As a citizen)

Thanks for your reply

SnapShawt
01-25-10, 05:15 AM
My advice: Leave the handcuffs at home and call the police. You have not been trained in how to use them both safely and tactfully, nor have you been trained on when you may and may not use them. You also have not taken classes or received training on your state's laws and criminal offenses. You best be absolutely sure that whatever it is you are effectually making a citizen's arrest for is actually an offense and meets all of the elements of the offense as defined under your state's penal code. If you decide to even detain someone, and they cooperate, and then it is found that you unlawfully detained them because the offense you thought was being committed actually wasn't, then say goodbye to your job, your money (lawsuit), and future career. And possibly even your freedom should criminal charges be filed against you.

You should do nothing more than observe and report unless life and/or property is in immediate danger, and then only what you reasonably CAN do until the police arrive.

If you ever DO detain someone and the police arrive and learn that no detention was justified, don't be surprised when they tell YOU to turn around and place your hands behind your back.

__FutureCop__
01-25-10, 06:18 AM
Solid advice.
Thank you

basher52
01-25-10, 09:00 AM
If the hotel you work for hired or contracted you as a security guard, you should be registed, as required in NYS. If registered, you would have taken at least and 8hr course and should have been fingerprinted and a background check done. Do yourself a favor and leave the cuffs home.

Ne_Smokey_Bear
01-25-10, 01:08 PM
My advice: Leave the handcuffs at home and call the police. You have not been trained in how to use them both safely and tactfully, nor have you been trained on when you may and may not use them. You also have not taken classes or received training on your state's laws and criminal offenses. You best be absolutely sure that whatever it is you are effectually making a citizen's arrest for is actually an offense and meets all of the elements of the offense as defined under your state's penal code. If you decide to even detain someone, and they cooperate, and then it is found that you unlawfully detained them because the offense you thought was being committed actually wasn't, then say goodbye to your job, your money (lawsuit), and future career. And possibly even your freedom should criminal charges be filed against you.

You should do nothing more than observe and report unless life and/or property is in immediate danger, and then only what you reasonably CAN do until the police arrive.

+1

I have seen some wicked injuries received by people that were not properly trained and the detainee used the cuffs as a weapon.

__FutureCop__
01-25-10, 09:05 PM
Seems like everyone is on the same page here
Thanks everyone

Joeyd6
01-25-10, 09:17 PM
If the hotel you work for hired or contracted you as a security guard, you should be registed, as required in NYS. If registered, you would have taken at least and 8hr course and should have been fingerprinted and a background check done. Do yourself a favor and leave the cuffs home.

Basher is on point. And I am calling Bravo Sierra on your post.

All security guards in NY State are registered with the state and required by law to take the 8 hour basic security guard course. The curriculum in the course is prescribed by the licensing guidelines, meaning no matter where you take the course, the same course outline, materials and handouts are used.

As a registered instructor for the State of NY, I can and have taught the 8 hour course. And guess what is covered in that 8 hour course? Your powers, what you can do, what you can't do, issues with cuffs/OC/guns and other aspects of what the state allows and does not allow. There is also a mandatory test at the end which includes questions to confirm you understand all this.

Additionally, each facility employing security guards must be licensed and follow state guidelines. Specifically they must provide a 16 Hour On-the-Job Training Course for Security Guards within 90 days of initial employment, or face a civil penalty ($25K + per guard) and have their premise license revoked. The security boss always knows what is legal and what is allowed as you are a liability to him/her and the company. No security manger in NY does "not know."

You either slept through the course or did not take the course. Based on your statements, I am betting on the second, and working somewhere in the hotel with an ancillary duty of providing "security" and you are taking it a step too far.

If you are telling the truth, you have serious issues as you and your employer are out of compliance with the entire State requirements. If you PM me your guard number and employer I will gladly get those issues resolved.

__FutureCop__
01-26-10, 11:20 PM
Easy there, I did take the 8 hour course, background check and finger printing, the course vaguely covers what situations i am allowed to use them in, I also took a 4 or 8 (can't remember specificly) hours training class after a month or two of being there.

I did my on the job training (first 2-3 weeks only on with my supervisor)

You can lay into me all you want, but all i was asking was for more situational answers.

And by my "Boss doesn't know", he's not a police officer i was looking for a more professional answer from someone who enforces laws. Rather than "only if you see the act committed and your positive it is a crime" If you read part of the original post "Is public intoxication warranted?" and by public intoxication, I mean more along the lines of disturbing the peace while being intoxicated.

Thanks for taking the time to respond :thumbsup:

JakeLock
01-27-10, 10:51 AM
I agree with all above about handcuffing, I'm not in NYS so I can't answer the legal side of it. As far as use, LEO's during the course of training, practice handcuffing for many, many hours. Hell, I teach a 4 hour REFRESHER (a class designed to advanced already advanced students) to experienced officers. Leave the cuffs at home.

Kimble
01-27-10, 12:02 PM
If you want to play cop, get hired as one. Security's job is to observe and report (being a good observer who can relate that info to law enforcement can make you a very valuable asset), so call the police if you see public intox or other criminal offenses.

Safety Steve
01-27-10, 02:15 PM
The answer is, Be Safe!

viperphi
01-31-10, 12:56 PM
Hardcore security? What kind of hotel do you work at exactly Future Copper?