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View Full Version : Shin Splints from Running?


kadie1414
08-17-08, 01:40 PM
I have a shin splint on my right leg. I just wanted to ask if anyone else has experienced this also? What's the best way to get running again? The first time it happened I stayed off of it till it went away then went running and it came right back. I'm not sure if my form is off while running or what? I usually run 3-4miles. Thanks.


Switchback
08-17-08, 02:17 PM
I got them when I started running high school track. The winter training starts indoors and the runnign surface is extremely hard. If you compound that with bad shoes and/or poor form, it can make for some bad days ahead of you. Short of rest, I ended up taping the legs (really sucks) and doing some strengthening exercises.

After that first season, I got a little rest for the first part of the summer. Then I started training for cross-country. Most of that was on trails and golf courses. I never had problems after that, including all the subsequent indoor training seasons for winter track.

Assuming you do not want to see a doctor and/or physical therapist to get suggestions on exercises, or even be evaluated for orthotics, I would make sure that you change your shoes out frequently and try to run on softer surfaces. Shoes, in terms of structure and support, can go out long before they LOOK worn out. Try to find some trails to run on. I am sure there are some parks nearby that would accommodate you. Even gravel roads in the country would be better than most tracks (just watch out for the crazy drivers). This worked for me and I ran for a solid 20 years, following these practices. :)

Jay7376
08-18-08, 11:42 AM
I used to have a problem with shin splints. One of my Sgts suggested that I shorten my stride.

So far no more shin splints.:D


intreker05
08-24-08, 04:38 PM
I have a shin splint on my right leg. I just wanted to ask if anyone else has experienced this also? What's the best way to get running again? The first time it happened I stayed off of it till it went away then went running and it came right back. I'm not sure if my form is off while running or what? I usually run 3-4miles. Thanks.

I had a friend in Army ROTC that did a lot of PT and he loved to run. He said he changed his shoes every six months or so. If you can't afford that, which I can totally understand, you may look at a padded insole insert that may help. Check your stride, make sure you aren't pounding your heel into the pavement or putting your foot down funny. For right now, to make the pain go away at least temporarily, I used ice and elevation and advil for mine. I got them last year when I was running and would put ice packs on every night for twenty minutes or so and elevate my leg on a pillow and take advil about an hour before I ran. It really helped.

noelchabanel
08-24-08, 05:12 PM
I got a mild case from running on uneven ground on a trail in the woods. If you've ever been to NH you know that the only flat ground in the state in manmade. It was a great workout, and doing it helped me to pass a fitness test, but I should have taken it easier when I started doing that. I know some people get stuck with them for months, so I was lucky, mine only lasted a few weeks. I took ibuprofen, drank tons of water, switched to running on a cushioned track, and haven't really had a problem since.

Switchback
08-24-08, 06:14 PM
It's my understanding that it is usually IMPACT that gives you shin splints. Trail running is usually the substitute for road/track running when you have shin splints.

Norm357
08-24-08, 06:28 PM
I avoid shin splints by not running. ;)

noelchabanel
08-24-08, 07:28 PM
It's my understanding that it is usually IMPACT that gives you shin splints. Trail running is usually the substitute for road/track running when you have shin splints.

You're right, but this is a lot of up and down hill, in 10 foot segments of up and down, part sand, part grass...a flatter trail may actually be a better option for me if I could find one :o

kadie1414
08-24-08, 07:33 PM
Thanks for your help and insight. My therapist recommended getting new insoles with a high arch because my right foot has very little arch. It seems to help so far. Thanks again.

nypd22
09-07-08, 02:23 AM
Hi. I just wanted to let you know that I have the same problem. When I was in the corrections academy back in 2001 I got shin splints in both shins. haven't ran in years and now preparing for this academy, The first time I ran they came right back. I went to Sports Authority and purchased shin wraps, they are made especially for shin splints. I also purchased orthodics (shoe inserts) and I ran last night for the second time in years and experienced absolutely no pain!!! Good luck to you. I was amased that it worked just like that. It's a miracle. :-)

charlydevo
09-09-08, 05:40 PM
See a podiatrist.

I have always had shin splint problems. Every time I started a running regiment, I developed shin splints. They always became painful enough to cause me to stop running.

I started running again about a year ago. Of course, the shin splints came back. I didn't want to stop this time. So, I went to a podiatrist who specializes in sports injuries.

He analyzed my feet, legs, etc. What he told me was surprising. Contrary to everybody else's advice, he told me to run on hard surfaces. In fact, he said the harder the surface the better. He also told me NOT to buy cushioned shoes, but rather to buy support shoes.

As it turns out, there are many different possibilities for the cause of our shin splints. Mostly, they come down to your body structure and the way you run. The bottom line is that you should really visit a doctor to get the right advice.

brendanhm
09-29-08, 08:45 PM
I don't recommend this, but this is what I do:

Take alot of ibuprofren before run, numb the pain, suck it up and keep running.

I had the worst shinsplints last year, I was running about 25 miles a week, anyways I made it through the pain and I havn't had any problems since. I don't know how to explain why it stopped, but it did..

Switchback
09-29-08, 08:51 PM
I don't recommend this, but this is what I do:

Take alot of ibuprofren before run, numb the pain, suck it up and keep running.

I had the worst shinsplints last year, I was running about 25 miles a week, anyways I made it through the pain and I havn't had any problems since. I don't know how to explain why it stopped, but it did..

Of course, you had to sign up for a organ donation list after destroying your liver.
:D

charlydevo
09-29-08, 11:08 PM
Besides a change of running sneakers and hard running surfaces, my foot doctor had me do some exercises that I'll try to explain. One exercise involves standing on a step with most of your feet off of the step. In other words, standing mostly on your toes. From there, dip your heels down as far as you can, and then raise them up until you are on standing on your toes again. Do that as many times as you can, a few times a day.

Another exercise involves sitting down with a leg crossed. Push against one side of your foot with your hand while using the stabilizer muscles in your ankle and shin to create an opposite force. Do that for a while with each foot.

The third exercise is a funny walk that goes like this;
Walk slowly by putting the heel of the forward foot on the ground. Slowly shift your weight until you are on the toes of your forward foot. Then, put the other foot in front of you the same way and do the same thing.

These exercises will help build strength and flexibility in the little stabilizer muscles of your ankle/shin area and strengthen the ligaments and tendons. That will eventually lead to less shin splints.

brendanhm
09-30-08, 12:40 PM
Of course, you had to sign up for a organ donation list after destroying your liver.
:D

hehe yeah that's why I don't recommend it.

I remember reading up on my "methods", apparently some marathon runners have had liver failure when taking ibuprofen. Something to do with water not being absorbed...cant remember.

rotasoda
12-14-08, 06:21 PM
Buy a foam roller, it worked for me. You roll on it to massage the shins, calfs and etc..

Kupes
02-28-09, 05:56 PM
Treat the cause, not the symptom. If you are constantly getting splints and are already in a steady routine [read: not just starting out or increasing your runs too fast without adequate rest], something is wrong with your feet or footwear.

I used to get severe shin/knee pain after my runs and would just rub down my knee/shins with frozen dixie cups and it would help, but I would always get the pain. I finally went to a running store nearby [I used Fleet Feet] and had one of their sales people [all are avid runners] look at my gait, measure my foot properly and listen to my situation. After he came out with about 6 sneakers for me to try, bought 2 pairs and haven't had pain since.

I also went to a podiatrist a few years ago for orthodics, which helped immensely, but they weren't sport ones [I wasn't running at that time].

Most good sneakers have a shelf life of 500 miles, so don't let them wear down too much.

CityOfChicago
05-04-09, 11:19 AM
Shin splints are usually caused by a combination of poor flexibility and impact. So, first off make sure you have a good pair of running shoes. That is, shoes designed for running, and in good shape. If you can, go to a specialty store and have your gait evaluated. Find out if you are a heel-striker, an over-pronator, or such (how muck your foot rolls in or out as you land and step off). They make shoes specific for all running types, and most cost under $150. That's money well spent.

Next, work on calf and shin flexibility. Calfs by hanging ur heel off a step or putting your toe up on a wall.

You may not know this, but the calf is actually two muscles - the the gastroc and the soleus. The gastroc crosses the knee joint to attach on the upper leg bone, the soleus does not. This is important, because it means you should strecth your calf two different ways - one with the knee straight (the gastroc is fully strecthed and therfore is stretched) and one with the knee bent (gastroc is passively contracted, therefore the soleus is stretched). This is also the reason why calf weight training should be done both standing AND seated.

Stretch you anterior tibialis (shin) by sitting on you lower legs with your feet in flexion. That is, get on your knees with the tops of your feet flat on the floor and your toes pointing behing you, then sit down on your calves.

Ease into your running. Start with slower paces and distances, increasing as your strength and tolerance increases.

If you have shin splints, ease the pain by filling those little paper cups withh water and freezing them. Then peel back the paper to expose the ice and massaging your shin with it. Or freeze a can of shaving foam and rolling it up and down your shin.

And finally, make sure your shoes are laced securely. Loose shoes alter your running, and will always cause shin splints.