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MDEMT280
03-04-07, 10:37 PM
The state in question is Maryland, but I'm interested in input from all over.

If a person is operating a piece of heavy machinery (a backhoe, a front end loader, whatever) that is primarily designed for industrial or construction use, must they have a driver's license, and of what class and type (CDL or non-CDL)? Does the law vary depending on whether the vehicle is trailered in and used solely at a site, driven to the site, or accesses the road infrequently (pulls out, drives 100 feet down to another driveway, and pulls back in)?

I've checked the Maryland MVA site, and I suppose the question is whether a piece of construction equipment is defined as a "motor vehicle" for the purposes of licensing.

Thanks.


Legoate
03-04-07, 11:23 PM
I'm guessing that if you were driving it on a public roadway open to other vehicles....like driving from one jobsite to another, than you may be required to have a license in CA. I'm not aware of an exemption, but I'm not really sure.

I've heard of DUI's on riding lawnmowers...so I'm guessing most of the traffic laws also apply to backhoes. If they didn't, every loser in town with a supsended license would be commuting via tractor. ;)

chiefhuntr
03-05-07, 02:15 AM
The law says you must have a DL to operata a motorvehicle on a public roadway. A backhoe is a motorized vehicle and if you drive it on a public roadway, you need to have a license.


MDEMT280
03-05-07, 08:38 AM
Thanks.

mcsap
03-05-07, 11:43 AM
AND , I believe that this is true in MD ( it is in PA) , rubber tired heavy equipment must have an SME or Special Mobile Equipment plate on it.

If you operate anything motorized on a public road , you must have a current license. You don't need a CDL for 99% of the SME stuff except for well drilling trucks , which are nothing more than a big truck with a drill attached.

MDEMT280
03-06-07, 05:09 PM
You are correct about the SME. My understanding, correct me if I'm wrong, is that SME tags are only needed if operated on the roadway? A vehicle can be trailered into and out of a site without tags?

And, since you are king of all things motor carrier :D a CDL is only needed if the vehicle is transporting people or property for hire, yes? A vehicle used in a business, say, a snowplow, or a mobile crane, they are not commercial? You only need the appropriate class (based on GVW) of non-CDL to operate?

Thanks again.

BP348
03-06-07, 09:05 PM
You are correct about the SME. My understanding, correct me if I'm wrong, is that SME tags are only needed if operated on the roadway? A vehicle can be trailered into and out of a site without tags?

And, since you are king of all things motor carrier :D a CDL is only needed if the vehicle is transporting people or property for hire, yes? A vehicle used in a business, say, a snowplow, or a mobile crane, they are not commercial? You only need the appropriate class (based on GVW) of non-CDL to operate?

Thanks again.

It all depends on the size of the equipment. If your going to transport a backhoe on a tractor-trailer then of course you need a CDL same goes with a crane. If the crane is small enough where you could drive it like a truck then same thing you need a CDL, simply because the size of the vehicle, it dosen't matter if its for hire or not.

But to operate said equipment on the job site, I don't believe you have to have a license. Of course to get hired to operate the equipment your going to have to prove you can.

I come from a large family of heavy equipment operaters and all have CDL's.

As far as the snowplow again it depends on the size, if it hooks to the front of a pick-up then you don't need a special license if you get into the bigger DOT size of trucks then you need a CDL to operate the truck.

chiefhuntr
03-06-07, 09:29 PM
It all depends on the size of the equipment.

Now why are you bringing that subject into the conversation?:eek:

MDEMT280
03-06-07, 10:22 PM
Ok.

Maryland defines commercial motor vehicles as "a motor vehicle or combination of motor vehicles used to transport passengers or property," and meeting certain weight or passenger capacity standards.

A commercial vehicle excludes fire apparatus, defense vehicles, RVs and vehicles operated by a farmer (under certain circumstances).

There are commerical and non-commercial licenses available for all weight classes. Hence my confusion about into which category a vehicle would fall if it doesn't really transport property, or if pushing dirt or snow is considered as transporting it.

You would figure the MVA would have a simple booklet saying, "Want to drive this? You need this license." Then again, I guess that's why people everywhere dislike motor vehicle departments. :rolleyes:

Thanks, everyone. CDL it is. Less hassle, more opportunities.

BP348
03-08-07, 12:37 AM
Now why are you bringing that subject into the conversation?:eek:

Any excuse to bragg my brother :D

BP348
03-08-07, 12:40 AM
CDL it is. Less hassle, more opportunities.

Better safe than sorry.

Can't go wrong with the CDL and every vehicle you've asked about would require a CDL to drive on the road.