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View Full Version : Special US Deputy Marshal


APD92
01-18-07, 07:37 AM
I know any non-fed assigned to any federal task force is credentialed at a Special US Deputy Marshal. My question are:

1) Do they just give you an ID card or is there an actaul Special Deputy US Marshal badge?

2) What authority do these credentials give you, do you possess the same authority as a Deputy US Marshal? Can you take cases to the US Attorney for prosecution?

Thanks


Group9
01-18-07, 08:37 AM
I was made one at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 and I didn't get no stickin' badge or ID card. :D

smcc360
01-18-07, 10:05 AM
The state and local officers on the task force I work with all get a full set of credentials (ID and tin).

The primary benefit is that it allows them unrestricted carry in non-reciprocal states (in my area, that's Jersey). As a practical matter, we handle contact with AUSAs, and they handle ADAs; just sticking to what we know.


Valor55
01-18-07, 10:19 AM
I was made one at the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 and I didn't get no stickin' badge or ID card. :D

Same thing when I worked Bush's first inauguration. They swore us in for the day so nothing was issued.

Sounds like if you are assigned to a task force where you will be in it for a period of time you get the tin and creds.

Swat1
01-18-07, 11:37 AM
If you are assigned to a federal task force and the federal agency "sponsors" you to be a federal task force agent (TFA) then you will be sworn in by the US Marshal in the district, however, any issuance of a badge and credentials fall on the sponsoring agency.

I was a TFA with the FBI on a violent crimes task force for six years. I was sworn in by the US Marshal for the District of Oregon and my credentials were issued by the FBI. We used our agency badges, but had FBI TFA credentials. As a task force, we could have commissioned a badge (after jumping through some hoops) but it was never an issue. Anytime I was acting within my federal authority, I used the credentials and they worked just fine.

Swat1*

Group9
01-18-07, 12:15 PM
If you are assigned to a federal task force and the federal agency "sponsors" you to be a federal task force agent (TFA) then you will be sworn in by the US Marshal in the district, however, any issuance of a badge and credentials fall on the sponsoring agency.

I was a TFA with the FBI on a violent crimes task force for six years. I was sworn in by the US Marshal for the District of Oregon and my credentials were issued by the FBI. We used our agency badges, but had FBI TFA credentials. As a task force, we could have commissioned a badge (after jumping through some hoops) but it was never an issue. Anytime I was acting within my federal authority, I used the credentials and they worked just fine.

Swat1*

That is the same way it is for state and local officers who are assigned as full time DEA Task Force Agents. They carry DEA issued credentials and badges, and are in the DEA chain of command, but in reality, they are Special Deputy United States Marshals. State and local officers who are deputized as SDUSM's to work with DEA on a case specific, or on a temporary basis, have a DEA form that grants them the same status and which conveys the same authority. Other federal agents, (such as ICE agents, for example), who are assigned to a DEA task force full time, operate off of their agency credentials, and may or may not be deputized, depending on what their parent agency's jurisdiction is.

I suspect this is pretty much how it is done in most federal agencies who use the SDUSM authority.

Group9
01-18-07, 12:21 PM
http://www.opm.gov/programs/ipa/

For more info on how state and local officers go to work for a federal agency on a temporary basis.

LastChance36
01-03-08, 04:25 PM
I am a local detective working as a Task Force Agent assigned to an ID Theft/White Collar Crime Task Force run by USPIS. We were all sworn in as a SDUSM's but didn't receive any badge or creds from either the USMS or USPIS. We got a piece of paper to sign after the Marshal swore us all in and thats it. No big deal with us because the chance of us actually having to make an arrest outside the area is slim and I really don't see us serving any federal warrants when we work with every other ABC federal agency in the city on the task force. Nice to put on a resume though!!

Switchback
01-03-08, 04:59 PM
It really matters on a resume? Outside of yoru duties on the TF, the deputization really means nothing. Hmm... who would have thunk it.

FWIW, the locals assigned to our TF (a U.S. Marshals Fugitive task force) DO have creds with a miniature badge on them. I don't see the purpose, though. They use their police creds for everything... the shirts and gear with USMS all over, intermingled with their departmental insignia, seems to be confusion enough. :)

LastChance36
01-03-08, 08:02 PM
Where the deputation of fugitive TF's are vital, and for ours, I can see the basic reason for it as well, but we just don't have the opportunities to use our Special Deputy "powers" since we have so many other fed guys on board. If we need any federal warrants or other things done through the USA, they usually run it and we are just along for support, which is fine with me. It's good to have just in case, but thats really it. As a matter of fact, the Marshal had no clue of who were were or that our TF even existed when we all showed up to be sworn in. 5 minutes with a handshake and we were out the door. As for the resume remark, I guess no one could see my tongue firmly inserted in my cheek when I said it! :D

Switchback
01-03-08, 08:26 PM
Well, the other fed task forces do not get these credentials. The FBI has one where it is a few agents and the rest (about 20) are locals. As far as I know, they are given nothing either. Like I said, I really don't see the necessity in it. When the dust settles, them (and you ) will be covered. :)

timberwulf
01-03-08, 10:21 PM
The primary benefit is that it allows them unrestricted carry in non-reciprocal states (in my area, that's Jersey).

On July 7, 2004, the Senate voted to pass H.B. 218 the National Concealed Carry for Cops legislation that was passed by the House on June 23, 2004. On July 22, 2004, President George W. Bush signed into law what is officially entitled the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act of 2004. This law allows qualified active (on- or off-duty) and honorably retired law enforcement officers to carry their firearms concealed nationwide.

Switchback
01-03-08, 10:37 PM
Hmm... never heard of that. :rolleyes:

Most of us, WORKING, don't have time for the time that it would take to confirm that an individual falls under H.R. 218.

Obviously, you have not been to Jersey. Also, H.R.218 does not address the ammo issue... and hollow points are illegal in Jersey.

ngcsubutterbar
01-03-08, 10:46 PM
I'd rather have the federal creds if I had any say in it. With cases in the past 'after' that legislation got signed where cops carrying were not only stopped and detained, but I believe one was arrested up in the nanny states. Besides that the legislation states specifically that federal rules trump it.





switch, should you be moving this to the other side of the fence? I really don't see why it has to be over here unless the OP wanted it that way.

Switchback
01-03-08, 11:07 PM
I think it is ok, for now. Some non-verifeds have had good input and I don't see anything that is an officer safety issue. Of course, if I missed something, I am open ears.

Group9
01-04-08, 12:32 AM
On July 7, 2004, the Senate voted to pass H.B. 218 the National Concealed Carry for Cops legislation that was passed by the House on June 23, 2004. On July 22, 2004, President George W. Bush signed into law what is officially entitled the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act of 2004. This law allows qualified active (on- or off-duty) and honorably retired law enforcement officers to carry their firearms concealed nationwide.

Yeah, but that doesn't get them federal attorneys representing them, and all of the other benefits of being in the scope of their federal duties when they shoot somebody or something, three states away from where they are an officer. Federal deputization does. And, that is the mainmost reason we do it for the task force officers in my agency, and I suspect, the mainmost reason, most other federal agencies do it.

The second most important reason, is that task force officers can't get OCDETF overtime reimbursement to their agency unless they are deputized.

They also need to have it to legally serve some federal subpeonas and other paperwork (and for a couple of other reasons that do have some OPSEC aspects to them).

We issue credentials and badges to regularly assigned task force officers, but not to those deputized for one specific investigation. The regularly assigned ones also have to go through the SSBI and get a security clearance, (which can be passed in joint investigations) the same as our regular agents. Case specific deputized officers only get a much smaller in scope background check.

Norm357
01-04-08, 02:12 AM
Hmm... never heard of that. :rolleyes:

Most of us, WORKING, don't have time for the time that it would take to confirm that an individual falls under H.R. 218.

Obviously, you have not been to Jersey. Also, H.R.218 does not address the ammo issue... and hollow points are illegal in Jersey.

Hollow points are not illegal in NJ. You just can't carry them in your weapon. How stupid is that?

schrute
01-04-08, 07:25 AM
Hollow points are not illegal in NJ. You just can't carry them in your weapon. How stupid is that?

They're legal to possess in your home (or place of business IIRC) and I'm pretty sure active NJ LEOs can carry them off duty (retired can't). I'm not sure how the law would treat an active out of state officer so federal creds might still be handy for that reason alone.

To my mind, the biggest problem woth the hollow point law here though is that they carry a mandantory 5 or 10 year sentencing enhancement if used in the commission of a crime, and NJ prosecutors and juries are not known to be particularly lenient in determining whar is and is not a justified defensive shooting.

God I love this state.:rolleyes:

LastChance36
01-04-08, 09:51 AM
I don't really want another set of creds anyway. I already have one set from my dept. I keep in a badge case, plus my wallet in the other pocket. I can see maybe an ID card to keep in my case, but there is really no need for a badge. Unless I wear 5.11's everyday and remind myself which badge is in which pocket, it's going to be a challenge if I have to produce my dept. creds in a hurry. :D

Switchback
01-04-08, 10:44 AM
They're legal to possess in your home (or place of business IIRC) and I'm pretty sure active NJ LEOs can carry them off duty (retired can't). I'm not sure how the law would treat an active out of state officer so federal creds might still be handy for that reason alone.

To my mind, the biggest problem woth the hollow point law here though is that they carry a mandantory 5 or 10 year sentencing enhancement if used in the commission of a crime, and NJ prosecutors and juries are not known to be particularly lenient in determining whar is and is not a justified defensive shooting.

God I love this state.:rolleyes:

If I recall, the hollow points can only be in a duty weapon. I think I remember an officer getting charged for having hollow points in a personally owned weapon. It's been a few years since I lived there, but it was all over the news back in the mid-late 90's.

schrute
01-04-08, 11:17 AM
If I recall, the hollow points can only be in a duty weapon. I think I remember an officer getting charged for having hollow points in a personally owned weapon. It's been a few years since I lived there, but it was all over the news back in the mid-late 90's.

I took a look at the statute (N.J.S.A. 2C:39-3(g)) and it appears that the LEO exemption for hollow points only applies on-duty or while travelling to or from work. Here's the actual language.

g.Exceptions. (1) Nothing in subsection a., b., c., d., e., f., j. or k. of this section shall apply to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States or the National Guard, or except as otherwise provided, to any law enforcement officer while actually on duty or traveling to or from an authorized place of duty, provided that his possession of the prohibited weapon or device has been duly authorized under the applicable laws, regulations or military or law enforcement orders... (there's more but it's not relevant).

I really do hope that I'm reading this wrong or that there is another provision that allows for off duty carry of hollow points but knowing this state, there probably isn't.

Switchback
01-04-08, 01:42 PM
Yeah.. thank God for my federal creds when living in that communist state!

timberwulf
01-04-08, 01:49 PM
Hmm... never heard of that. :rolleyes:

Most of us, WORKING, don't have time for the time that it would take to confirm that an individual falls under H.R. 218.

Obviously, you have not been to Jersey. Also, H.R.218 does not address the ammo issue... and hollow points are illegal in Jersey.

No, I've never been to Jersey. I travel North as little as possible. I'm not sure what you mean by "WORKING," but having records make contact with the subject-in-question's agency wouldn't take that long. The hollow point issue is news to me, and yet another fine example of legislation designed to limit criminals who don't care anyway. I'm glad I live in TN.

Switchback
01-04-08, 01:54 PM
I mean, when you are WORKING (on the job) in Jersey and not a fed, you would not have time for the necessary verifications. It is hardly as simple as a call to a subject's agency.

timberwulf
01-04-08, 09:21 PM
I guess it's a difference in agencies. I work in Knoxville, TN, which is a medium sized city with separate city/county law enforcement. Our records department isn't usually overwhelmed to the point they can't make those kinds inquiries. Which brings me to another question. I've attempted to get verified by PMing RealPolice and Citicop. Any suggestions who else I can have verify my employment for full access to this forum?

Switchback
01-04-08, 11:18 PM
I ran the verification process here. Due to recent develpoments, I havbe given it back to RealPolice. If you do n ot like the timeliness issue, I woudl suggest you PM him and let him know. It's up to him if he wants us to do the verifications again. I can't speak for the others, but I don't care to do them for nothing (not speaking of pay, but in terms of the system's integrity). Perhaps with enough complaints, he will decide if he wants it done properly or not.

...and on a good day when we were doing the verifications, we would have them done in 1-2 days... then you could wait 2 weeks for RP to come around to flip the switch.

Kimble
01-05-08, 08:14 AM
Which brings me to another question. I've attempted to get verified by PMing RealPolice and JakeBP. Any suggestions who else I can have verify my employment for full access to this forum?
Don't do that, dude. Bad form. You're hijacking a thread to go off into an off-topic discussion that would better be suited via PM. Please refrain from hijacking threads in the future.