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View Full Version : Caution: Unmarked police cars


Nole795
12-24-06, 11:21 AM
Caution: Unmarked police cars

What to do if you're told to pull over

By Nicole T. Lesson
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Posted December 24 2006


On Alert highlights public safety issues or features a recent incident.



A car pulls behind you, lights flashing. It's not the standard police vehicle but looks legitimate. What should you do?

It's a question being asked more frequently as law enforcement agencies are using non-traditional vehicles to enforce traffic laws.

Police officials suggest slowing down and calling 911 to check on whether an officer is pulling you over.

"Acknowledge they are there, put the flashers on, drive to a well-lit, populated area and travel below the speed limit," said Davie Police Lt. Bill Bamford. "When you do pull over, crack the window and tell them you are not giving them any information until a marked car is here. Keep your doors locked."

He said drivers should also ask to see a photo ID.

"It `s just like if someone knocks on your front door from the police department or FP&L. Ask for an ID card and call to verify it," Bamford said.

He says you shouldn't drive home with the car following you, for two reasons.

"If you go home, officers can get highly concerned, and you get into a situation where family members will now be coming outside," Bamford said. "Also, for your safety, if it isn't a police officer and you take him home, it has just compounded the problem."

Since March, the Davie Police Department has used two Dodge Chargers for traffic enforcement of speeding, excessive lane changes and tailgating.

"Many departments are using non-traditional cars to combat the growing number of traffic violations," Bamford said. "We use them to blend in with community and combat the problem of aggressive driving and trucks carrying illegal loads."

The vehicles are marked with Davie Police on the side and have no light bar across the top but do have flashing lights installed in the grill, windshield and taillights. Officers are in full uniform.

"Some may not immediately recognize them as a police officer," said Bamford, who added the department does not encourage plain-clothed officers to pull drivers over.

In Central Florida, a convicted felon was recently accused of impersonating an Osceola County sheriff's deputy and pulling over drivers.

According to a local media report, the man had a Taser gun, flashing lights and a badge apparently purchased online or from a magazine. He was captured after stopping a real officer.

"In the past five to six years, there's been a dramatic proliferation of people impersonating police officers," Hollywood Police Capt. Tony Rode said. "Part of the problem is the ability for offenders to purchase police equipment from stores or the Internet."

On Dec. 7, a woman was pulled over at 4 a.m. by bogus cops in Inverness, Ill., who robbed her at gunpoint, according to the Daily Herald newspaper.

The robbers drove an unmarked car with flashing blue lights to dupe the woman into pulling over.

Richard Ashton, project manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, said there have also been a few cases in Virginia and Maryland.

"But nothing recently," Ashton said. "And police agencies have been proactive on it."

For two years, the Florida Highway Patrol has used unmarked Mercury Marauders to combat aggressive driving on the interstates.

The stealth vehicles are equipped with numerous lights inside the interior, in the grill, headlights and above the window.

"There's not going to be a question whether these unmarked cars are real police cars, and they are in full uniform," Sgt. Mark Wysocky said.

Hollywood police use unmarked Dodge Chargers equipped with lights and sirens. The department has a policy against stopping drivers with unmarked cars unless it is a major felony violation. He also recommends checking with 911 if there are any questions.

"If in fact the person is not uniformed and in an unmarked unit they should not be offended," Rode said. "Call 911 and if he or she is not a real officer, we are still on our way. We love to arrest people like that."

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/broward/sfl-dc24alertdec24,0,4383173.story?coll=sfl-news-browardcomm


Big Sexy
12-24-06, 11:34 AM
BIG's vehicle is equipped with lights and such, but is far from a "traditional" police vehicle. That coupled with the fact that BIG doesn't wear a uniform.

BIG has been pulled over a couple of times himself, by marked units. BIG pulls over and activates his own christmas lights, so as not to cause too much concern on the part of the officer. Of course, whether or not BIG activates his lights, depends on the area BIG finds himself. If it is in one of his gang areas, then BIG choices not to burn his vehicle, unnecessarily.

cntryboy0531
12-24-06, 12:40 PM
I don't find the remark of "crack the window and tell them you are not giving them any information until a marked car is here. Keep your doors locked." anything near appropriate... Once a LEO identifies himself as one, by ID or uniform, whatever the case may be, there should be NO doubt what so ever in the mind of the driver that the person is an actual cop. If that was done here, after we ID'ed ourself, and I got that line, I'd be extracting the driver from the car, and placing them under arrest.


phantasm
12-24-06, 03:17 PM
if I'm in plain clothes with my shield (and ID) and someone refuses to cooperate until a marked unit appears, they are at the bare minimum getting hammered for EVERYTHING that I can possibly think if, it not arrested. In addition to the standard unmarked units, precincts in the city also have unmarked yellow cabs. :) That'll make people think twice about doing something stupid by yellow cabs now too.

Darin
12-24-06, 03:35 PM
I don't find the remark of "crack the window and tell them you are not giving them any information until a marked car is here. Keep your doors locked." anything near appropriate... Once a LEO identifies himself as one, by ID or uniform, whatever the case may be, there should be NO doubt what so ever in the mind of the driver that the person is an actual cop. If that was done here, after we ID'ed ourself, and I got that line, I'd be extracting the driver from the car, and placing them under arrest.

+1 Agreed

Norm357
12-24-06, 04:29 PM
Non issue in GA. Police cannot work traffic in an unmarked unit. Some yahoo tries to pull me over in an unmarked car, he is gonna get the middle finger while Im on the phone with 911.;)

phantasm
12-24-06, 05:21 PM
Just because someone isn't working traffic, doesn't mean they won't encounter a traffic stop for one reason or another. Just because something is called a traffic stop, doesn't mean that the cause for the stop is a traffic infraction/moving violation.

Norm357
12-24-06, 05:24 PM
Just because someone isn't working traffic, doesn't mean they won't encounter a traffic stop for one reason or another. Just because something is called a traffic stop, doesn't mean that the cause for the stop is a traffic infraction/moving violation.

The Cops here will call for a marked unit if they needed someone pulled over. The odds of a real police officer pulling someone over here in an unmarked unit range between slim and none, and slim left town last week.

With that said, if the 911 operator confirmed that it was in fact a police officer, I would then go ahead and pull over.

Nole795
12-24-06, 07:13 PM
:D
The Cops here will call for a marked unit if they needed someone pulled over. The odds of a real police officer pulling someone over here in an unmarked unit range between slim and none, and slim left town last week.

With that said, if the 911 operator confirmed that it was in fact a police officer, I would then go ahead and pull over.


The real question is would you still have your middle finger out while pulling the car over...:D

Big Sexy
12-24-06, 07:23 PM
The Cops here will call for a marked unit if they needed someone pulled over. The odds of a real police officer pulling someone over here in an unmarked unit range between slim and none, and slim left town last week.

With that said, if the 911 operator confirmed that it was in fact a police officer, I would then go ahead and pull over.

That's all well and good, if it is in fact the local police, who is trying to pull you over.

But if it is BIG, or another agent in his agency or one of many agents BIG knows in other agencies, we wouldn't necessarily be in a Crown Vic or Impala. Also dialing 911 wouldn't help, unless we'd already called a local agency to help us with a failure to yield.

Norm357
12-24-06, 08:01 PM
But if it is BIG, or another agent in his agency or one of many agents BIG knows in other agencies, we wouldn't necessarily be in a Crown Vic or Impala. Also dialing 911 wouldn't help, unless we'd already called a local agency to help us with a failure to yield.




Then I guess we would be rolling till the marked units showed up.

BlueKnight901
12-24-06, 11:17 PM
I have family that live in GA...He is a traffic officer and DOES NOT drive a marked unit....his vehicle is an unmarked impala. BTW if you pulled that "I'm not gana stop till a marked unit arrives" crap with my agency or any around here....your butt would be in jail.

Jenna2006
12-24-06, 11:32 PM
In addition to the standard unmarked units, precincts in the city also have unmarked yellow cabs. :) That'll make people think twice about doing something stupid by yellow cabs now too.

So what happens when people needing rides try to hail those yellow cabs? :p

scarlet_tunic
12-25-06, 12:41 AM
"Since March, the Davie Police Department has used two Dodge Chargers for traffic enforcement of speeding, excessive lane changes and tailgating"...

..."said Bamford, who added the department does not encourage plain-clothed officers to pull drivers over."

So what do these unmarked car officers do, shake their finger at the dangerous driver?

:D

Norm357
12-25-06, 01:21 AM
I have family that live in GA...He is a traffic officer and DOES NOT drive a marked unit....his vehicle is an unmarked impala. BTW if you pulled that "I'm not gana stop till a marked unit arrives" crap with my agency or any around here....your butt would be in jail.

Bullflop. It is a violation of State code to work traffic in an unmarked unit. Don't believe me, check with POST. Your family member is admiting to breaking the law. How nice.

phantasm
12-25-06, 08:36 AM
reference with link to law requiring a marked (or disallowing an unmarked) vehicle to pull over a vehicle in georgia?

Norm357
12-25-06, 10:53 AM
reference with link to law requiring a marked (or disallowing an unmarked) vehicle to pull over a vehicle in georgia?

GA code is confusing to search, but I found several refrences like this one from John Dashlers website when he ran for Governor last election.


Safety on Georgia’s Highways

"Georgia is the only state in the South that does not allow unmarked patrol cars."

LINK (http://www.dashlerforgov.com/news/PublicSafety.htm)

Here is the GA code section if you feel like searching.
LINK (http://www.legis.ga.gov/legis/GaCode/?title=1)

Or you could Email POST and ask them yourself. LINK (http://www.gapost.org/)


Or you could simply ask Sbrad. I know since Im not verified, some choose to not believe me. The poster who claimed he has a family member working traffic in GA in an unmarked is either misinformed or a liar.

Big Sexy
12-25-06, 11:15 AM
I know since Im not verified, some choose to not believe me.

This isn't true, we all know you're verified and certifiably loco. :D
If ever a "civilian", (oh how BIG knows you love that name), was allowed access to the verified section, you, would most definitely get BIG's vote. ;)

Shegens357Mag
12-25-06, 11:27 AM
We have unmarked police cars here but I've never seen them make a traffic stop. I have seen them backup a traffic stop.

Now that I'm older and wiser, I think I could tell the difference between a real cop in an unmarked car and an imposter but....

When I was 17, I was pulled over at night by an unmarked car. He had a blue light on the dash and that was enough to convince me. The "officer" asked to see my driver's license, took down the info, and let me go. When I got home I told my Dad what happened and he called the city police. They asked me to describe the officer and when I got to the part about the beard they said "we don't allow beards". That little piece of info told them that I had been stopped by someone other than a police officer. I got lucky. This happened in 1970 when there wasn't as much meaness in the world. If that had been today, I would probably have been raped and/or dead.

If I were to be stopped at night when it's hard to see the car, etc. I would hesitate to stop because of that long ago experience but I would stop in a very public spot. My windows would be down just enough to communicate with him. I would then let him know that I have a permit to carry, the way I would in any situation. My doors would stay locked until he properly identified himself.

My worry is for young girls that are alone in a car at night and don't know any better, like I didn't know any better. Stopping for any unmarked car with a man in it could be disastrous. In that case, I think a marked car/officer should be there during the stop. This is just my opinion as a female, mother, and grandmother of girls.

Norm357
12-25-06, 11:36 AM
I can also give an example.

In 98 or 99, Henry County PD was running radar from unmarked mustangs and using marked units to effect the stop. Some smart cookie protested this, and took it all the way to the State Supreme Court. The Court, in its wisdom, dismissed almost 200 tickets citing the use of the unmarked cars to run radar.

Big Sexy
12-25-06, 11:39 AM
BIG agrees, impostors are out there. But as stated, BIG doesn't drive a traditional police vehicle, nor does BIG work or make traffic stops. Unless of course, the guy was running over pedestrians and forcing other vehicles off of the road.

That being said, there are times that we will pull a vehicle over. Preferably we would like a local marked unit for this. Both for their high visibility and keeping ourselves incognito as much as possible. The bad guy may not sweat a "traffic" stop, but may become suspicious if pulled over by "Feds", since that isn't our usual function.

That being said, sometimes it's unavoidable and we are left to our own devices and must conduct the stop ourselves.

StationM
12-25-06, 01:05 PM
I once had an off-duty Lieutenant make a stop in his unmarked unit....seems he was right behind another vehicle when the passenger reached out and popped a blue flashing dome light on the roof and illegally passed other drivers to get on the freeway.

Boy, were they surprised! :D

**edit**

He did request marked units from the city he was in at the time, one of our neighbors.

phantasm
12-25-06, 02:06 PM
I found that georgia code site bfeore I asked here, and that site is a nightmare, did multiple searches with words like "police car", "emercency vehicle" "unmarked", but I'm not going to browse the entire law.

My interpretation from the Governers statement is that highway patrol and state police and the such do not use unmarked vehicles, but that doesn't mean that Atlanta PD wouldn't use an unmarked vehicle, and perform a car stop if neccesary. NYSP at one point did use unmarked vehicles, but approximately 10 years stopped using unmarked vehicles voluntarily for vehicle stops. The highway units that use the unmarked highway units (or slicktop highway units) primarily enforcing VTL are always in uniform. NYPD has at least unmarked impalas, crown vics, and chargers for traffic enforcement, and maybe other cars too. NCPD has at least slicktop and unmarked impalas and crown vics.

Just as an addendum, NYC (which is very unique) utilizes plainclothes officers in unmarked vehicles who do sometimes do car stops, but they're not out there for traffic enforcement. They deal with vice (as was sean in the recent "controversial" shooting) as well as narcotics, gang, anti-crime, conditions, autocrime, etc. Some of these units (vice, narcotics, etc) will use non-traditional vehicles ranging from anything from a rental vehicle to a confiscated vehicle.

I can't believe how difficult it is to find info. Put "NYSP unmarked" into a search engine, 1st link comes to info on the NYSP website which has info that NYSP doesn't use unmarked for the primary unit for traffic enforcement, but that other agencies do.

Darin
12-25-06, 02:51 PM
Some smart cookie protested this, and took it all the way to the State Supreme Court. The Court, in its wisdom, dismissed almost 200 tickets citing the use of the unmarked cars to run radar.

:confused: That's stooooopid!

In Virginia we can act like construction workers and run RADAR. Then make a stop in our unmarked vehicle :D

Norm357
12-25-06, 03:06 PM
I found that georgia code site bfeore I asked here, and that site is a nightmare, did multiple searches with words like "police car", "emercency vehicle" "unmarked", but I'm not going to browse the entire law.


I agree, the site is a nightmare. All the while my ham was baking, I was searching for the relavant code.


My interpretation from the Governers statement is that highway patrol and state police and the such do not use unmarked vehicles, but that doesn't mean that Atlanta PD wouldn't use an unmarked vehicle, and perform a car stop if neccesary.

Governor wannabe. He lost. Let me assure you though, no one uses unmarked units to work traffic.


Just as an addendum, NYC (which is very unique) utilizes plainclothes officers in unmarked vehicles who do sometimes do car stops, but they're not out there for traffic enforcement. They deal with vice (as was sean in the recent "controversial" shooting) as well as narcotics, gang, anti-crime, conditions, autocrime, etc. Some of these units (vice, narcotics, etc) will use non-traditional vehicles ranging from anything from a rental vehicle to a confiscated vehicle.



Yeah, that's pretty neat.


In Virginia we can act like construction workers and run RADAR. Then make a stop in our unmarked vehicle

I believe this stems from GAs reputation as a spped trap back in the 60s. That's just my opinion though.

Darin
12-25-06, 07:00 PM
I think the whole state of Virginia has the rep for being a speed trap. At least that's my goal :D :p

Norm357
12-25-06, 07:05 PM
I think the whole state of Virginia has the rep for being a speed trap. At least that's my goal :p

I think so too! The VSP is brutal! :eek:

Darin
12-25-06, 08:50 PM
I think so too! The VSP is brutal! :eek:

Well I was actually thinking of a small dept. in VA. with an eager beaver traffic nazi.

:D

DetSarg1
12-27-06, 12:18 AM
Non issue in GA. Police cannot work traffic in an unmarked unit.

Smart move on Georgiaís part. More states should follow suit.

Badges, IDs and blue lights can be purchased by anyone. If me, or my wife, gets pulled by someone in an unmarked car without externally mounted lights, there is NO WAY Iím pulling over until I am in the parking lot of a very busy shopping center or other place with a lot of people.

Iím also on the phone to 911 and the line stays open until Iím stratified itís a cop at my window, which will be opened only a crack as recommend by Florida law enforcement officersÖlike me. Take me, or my wife, to jail if you mustÖIíll go all the way to a jury trial. With stories like the one in the OP, chances are it would get dropped by the state before it ever went that far. As it should.

Badges and IDs are a dime a dozen. Tell me what agency you want and Iíll make you an ID on PhotoShop in about 10 minutes. Badges may take a day or two but they are not hard to come by either.

I have driven an unmarked car for years and have made stops on occasion. Some people were hesitant and asked for ID, which I gladly showed.

The cop who does a stop in an unmarked car and does not FULLY understand the publicís legitimate concern for their safety has no business in an unmarked car.

Put you wife, sister or mother on a secluded road at night. Now there is a blue light on a dashboard and maybe some corner strobes behind her. Should she pull over?

phantasm
12-27-06, 01:37 AM
blue light in NY = volly FD
red light = PD

scott715us
12-27-06, 02:54 AM
We have unmarked police cars here but I've never seen them make a traffic stop. I have seen them backup a traffic stop.

Now that I'm older and wiser, I think I could tell the difference between a real cop in an unmarked car and an imposter but....

When I was 17, I was pulled over at night by an unmarked car. He had a blue light on the dash and that was enough to convince me. The "officer" asked to see my driver's license, took down the info, and let me go. When I got home I told my Dad what happened and he called the city police. They asked me to describe the officer and when I got to the part about the beard they said "we don't allow beards". That little piece of info told them that I had been stopped by someone other than a police officer. I got lucky. This happened in 1970 when there wasn't as much meaness in the world. If that had been today, I would probably have been raped and/or dead.

If I were to be stopped at night when it's hard to see the car, etc. I would hesitate to stop because of that long ago experience but I would stop in a very public spot. My windows would be down just enough to communicate with him. I would then let him know that I have a permit to carry, the way I would in any situation. My doors would stay locked until he properly identified himself.

My worry is for young girls that are alone in a car at night and don't know any better, like I didn't know any better. Stopping for any unmarked car with a man in it could be disastrous. In that case, I think a marked car/officer should be there during the stop. This is just my opinion as a female, mother, and grandmother of girls.

Metro Nashville PD has many of them. Aggressive driving, Flex, and DUI guys all have some unmarks. They are VERY effective. Of those I have seen in my area, they are lit up like you wouldn't believe.

I think the ones you have to worry about are people with just one light that may run out of a cigarette lighter. You don't see too many impersonators spending thousands of dollars in LED's & strobes to attempt to kindap/rob somebody.

mcsap
12-27-06, 03:09 AM
PA has a neat unmarked law, it just says that the legislature/PennDot cannot make any unmarked police car laws until at least a certain date , which has now passed. I think it was in 2004.

So, anytime in the next hundred years they want to limit us , they can. So far , nothing has happened.

Norm357
12-27-06, 04:17 AM
blue light in NY = volly FD
red light = PD

Exact opposite here.

Shegens357Mag
12-27-06, 06:50 AM
I think the ones you have to worry about are people with just one light that may run out of a cigarette lighter. You don't see too many impersonators spending thousands of dollars in LED's & strobes to attempt to kindap/rob somebody.

That was the kind that stopped me many many years ago.

The unmarked cars I see here are usually backing up a drug stop or something like that. I see them occasionally on Interstate 75 between my house in Riceville and Cleveland, where I work. We have a lot of drug task force units that patrol parts of I-75 and they are with them quite a bit. I've never seen one with it's lights on though. I'm in an extremely rural area so I'm sure there are more of them in the larger cities like Chattanooga than there are here.

phantasm
12-27-06, 11:16 AM
Exact opposite here.

I'm glad there's consistiency across the country. So some guy from Georgia will pull over for a volly firefighter in his personal car here in NY, but not for the unmarked police car, and vice versa.

Group9
12-27-06, 12:05 PM
I drive an unmarked pick up truck as an OGV. It is equipped with red and white strobe lights all over the place, as well as blue lights hidden in the grill, and a blue light on a visor, and a blue light hidden in the rear window, as well as a siren and air horn.

But, even so, if I tried to stop someone, I would not get that torqued up if they did not pull over until they got to a more well lit and populated area, as long as they didn't do anything to make me think they were destroying evidence, or trying to flee (things going out the window make me believe they KNOW it is the police).

But, we almost never make a stop alone, and we try to have marked units participate whenever possible, but I don't think it is reasonable for someoen to think that there is a gang who has taken several late model vehicles, and equipped them with integral lights and sirens, just for the purpose of getting together and stopping people.

I wish I still had the recording, that was great, of one of our stops where the driver calls 911 and says he is being stopped by four cars full of fake police. You can clearly hear the sirens going in the tape and the 911 operator points that out, saying, "I think they are the police, you should pull over."

The last thing on the tape is him saying that the cars have boxed him in and that his window is being broken out, and that he is being pulled out of the window. :D

Norm357
12-27-06, 12:18 PM
I'm glad there's consistiency across the country. So some guy from Georgia will pull over for a volly firefighter in his personal car here in NY, but not for the unmarked police car, and vice versa.



LOL :D

Slowspeed
12-28-06, 12:44 AM
See if you can make sense of them:
I submit for your review.

Georgia
40-1-7.
Whenever pursuing a person in violation of a traffic related offense, a uniformed law enforcement officer who is assigned routinely or primarily to traffic law enforcement or other traffic safety duties on the roadways or highways of this state must place a visible blue light on the roof of his or her vehicle if such vehicle is not equipped with permanent exterior mounted roof blue lights; provided, however, that the provisions of this Code section shall not apply to law enforcement officers operating vehicles manufactured prior to 2001. This Code section shall not apply to any officer assigned to special operations activities or responding to an immediate threat to public safety as a result of an accident or other emergency. This Code section shall not apply to vehicles of the Georgia State Patrol or of a sheriff́s office or police department which office or police department provides law enforcement services by certified peace officers 24 hours a day, seven days a week where the vehicles are marked in accordance with Code Section 40-8-91, with flashing or revolving colored lights visible under normal atmospheric conditions for a distance of 500 feet from the front and rear of such vehicle, and which also has an illuminating agency identifier reasonably visible to a driver of a vehicle subject to a traffic stop; provided, however, that the Georgia State Patrol shall not be permitted to have more than two vehicles per post without such exterior mounted roof lights; and, provided, further that a sheriff́s office or police department shall not be permitted to have more than one vehicle per agency without such exterior mounted roof lights. An otherwise lawful arrest shall not be invalidated or in any manner affected by failure to comply with this Code section.

AND

40-8-91.
(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this Code section, any motor vehicle which is used on official business by any person authorized to make arrests for traffic violations in this state, or any municipality or county thereof, shall be distinctly marked on each side and the back with the name of the agency responsible therefor, in letters not less than four inches in height.
(b) Any motor vehicle, except as hereinafter provided in this subsection, used by any employee of the Georgia State Patrol for the purpose of enforcing the traffic laws of this state shall be distinctly painted, marked, and equipped in such manner as shall be prescribed by the commissioner of public safety pursuant to this Code section. The commissioner in prescribing the manner in which such vehicles shall be painted, marked, or equipped shall: THIS SECTION ONLY APPLIES TO GEORGIA STATE PATROL VEHICLES

Norm357
12-28-06, 01:20 AM
See if you can make sense of them:
I submit for your review.

Georgia
40-1-7.
Whenever pursuing a person in violation of a traffic related offense, a uniformed law enforcement officer who is assigned routinely or primarily to traffic law enforcement or other traffic safety duties on the roadways or highways of this state must place a visible blue light on the roof of his or her vehicle if such vehicle is not equipped with permanent exterior mounted roof blue lights; provided, however, that the provisions of this Code section shall not apply to law enforcement officers operating vehicles manufactured prior to 2001. This Code section shall not apply to any officer assigned to special operations activities or responding to an immediate threat to public safety as a result of an accident or other emergency. This Code section shall not apply to vehicles of the Georgia State Patrol or of a sheriff́s office or police department which office or police department provides law enforcement services by certified peace officers 24 hours a day, seven days a week where the vehicles are marked in accordance with Code Section 40-8-91, with flashing or revolving colored lights visible under normal atmospheric conditions for a distance of 500 feet from the front and rear of such vehicle, and which also has an illuminating agency identifier reasonably visible to a driver of a vehicle subject to a traffic stop; provided, however, that the Georgia State Patrol shall not be permitted to have more than two vehicles per post without such exterior mounted roof lights; and, provided, further that a sheriff́s office or police department shall not be permitted to have more than one vehicle per agency without such exterior mounted roof lights. An otherwise lawful arrest shall not be invalidated or in any manner affected by failure to comply with this Code section.

AND

40-8-91.
(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this Code section, any motor vehicle which is used on official business by any person authorized to make arrests for traffic violations in this state, or any municipality or county thereof, shall be distinctly marked on each side and the back with the name of the agency responsible therefor, in letters not less than four inches in height.
(b) Any motor vehicle, except as hereinafter provided in this subsection, used by any employee of the Georgia State Patrol for the purpose of enforcing the traffic laws of this state shall be distinctly painted, marked, and equipped in such manner as shall be prescribed by the commissioner of public safety pursuant to this Code section. The commissioner in prescribing the manner in which such vehicles shall be painted, marked, or equipped shall: THIS SECTION ONLY APPLIES TO GEORGIA STATE PATROL VEHICLES

Hey thanks!

Slowspeed
12-28-06, 01:30 AM
40-1-7
Seems to say that vehicles of a special unit, (road rage unit, etc.) of the department, do not have to be marked, or if an unmarked unit observed an emergency.

40-8-91
Seems to say that on a normal basis vehicles of the department will be marked with 4 inch markings on the sides and rear.

phantasm
12-28-06, 11:32 AM
According to 40-8-91a, any unmarked vehicle is not allowed at all at any time for any purpose by anyone who is allowed to make arrests for traffic infractions? I know all PO's in NYS have arrest power for traffic infractions (at least in their GAOE). I'm playing devil's advocate now. Wouldn't the higher ranks still have "arrest power"? So even unmarked cars for supervisors would be disallowed.

BlueKnight901
01-01-07, 03:46 AM
40-1-7
Seems to say that vehicles of a special unit, (road rage unit, etc.) of the department, do not have to be marked, or if an unmarked unit observed an emergency.

40-8-91
Seems to say that on a normal basis vehicles of the department will be marked with 4 inch markings on the sides and rear.


"Whenever pursuing a person in violation of a traffic related offense, a uniformed law enforcement officer who is assigned routinely or primarily to traffic law enforcement or other traffic safety duties on the roadways or highways of this state must place a visible blue light on the roof of his or her vehicle if such vehicle is not equipped with permanent exterior mounted roof blue lights;"


Yea i agree.... thats how un-marked units are allowed in GA.

MDEMT280
01-01-07, 01:09 PM
provided, however, that the provisions of this Code section shall not apply to law enforcement officers operating vehicles manufactured prior to 2001

So all you have to do is stick all your traffic officers in cars model year 2000 or before, and you can run all the unmarked traffic you want! :D