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Sphagnum
06-21-06, 11:14 PM
I was attending a "seminar" that the CHP recruiters were putting on (re: the background investigation that we're all undergoing) and one Sgt. said something that I'd never heard before and it caught me off guard.

He said: "The average life expectency of a CHP officer is 57"

Wow... Combination of being killed on the job and living a stressful lifestyle that tends to end ones life earlier than otherwise it would.

I'm sure all you that are LEO already know stats like this, so I guess this is more for those like me that are just getting into the career...


Valor55
06-21-06, 11:22 PM
I think that figure is not specific to CHP.

Cops have a way of dying shortly after retirement. 20 years of terrible diets and all kinds of stress and sleep problems...

cwillis0001
06-21-06, 11:59 PM
I think that figure is not specific to CHP.

Cops have a way of dying shortly after retirement. 20 years of terrible diets and all kinds of stress and sleep problems...
And that's if your lucky enough to have 20 year retirement;)


Oscarsjava
06-22-06, 12:23 AM
He said: "The average life expectency of a CHP officer is 57"


So THAT'S why they're cool with a 90% pension...

MP_Steve
06-22-06, 12:47 AM
I think that figure is not specific to CHP.

Cops have a way of dying shortly after retirement. 20 years of terrible diets and all kinds of stress and sleep problems...

I have never heard of this statistic before. It's an eye opener... Wow...

NOLACOP
06-22-06, 01:50 AM
i f ound this lil tidbit...kinda outdated but scary nonetheless.

“Retirement is tough for cops. Their average life expectancy after
retirement is five years, according to '91 FBI statistics.
Psychotherapist and former police officer Albert Seng says a number of
cops go through a grief process in disconnecting from "a lifestyle
rather than a job." Once you're out of it, you're really out of it.
You're on the outside.”

cobravenom1
06-22-06, 02:08 AM
I'm never going to retire. That means I'll live forever, right?:D

Hop
06-22-06, 03:37 AM
Hmmm. I had just read somewhere that we were living longer now... I thought they said 71. I'll have to remember where I read that.

ngcsubutterbar
06-22-06, 03:48 AM
So THAT'S why they're cool with a 90% pension...
What is this term pension, some new word for what we don't have? :D

hitnrun
06-22-06, 03:49 AM
You gotta realize, the stats mentioned above are based on officers dying NOW that started working 20-30 years ago. Drinking, Smoking, Drugs etc. were all different vices that were regularly used to help LEOs to cope with the stresses and pains of the job. Don't get me wrong, we still have LEOs that indulge in there various vices today, but I don't think it is as prevalent.

Now we have, grief/crisis counselors/chaplains, stress leave, better forms of stress management, better equipment, more partners, more varied assignments. All of these things can help to reduce the daily stress level a LEO might endure throughout a 20-30 year career.

Back in the "day," (no offense RetDetSgt), it was a lot more run and gun, kick *** and take names, etc. Today, things are done differently for many obvious reasons, one being liberals, but you get the idea. Somebody back me up here...RetDet??

Does any of this make sense??

ngcsubutterbar
06-22-06, 03:51 AM
It's still quite runnish and gunnish here; thuggish ruggish bone.

Jenna2006
06-22-06, 07:36 AM
I was attending a "seminar" that the
He said: "The average life expectency of a CHP officer is 57

Even given the physical and psychological hazards of law enforcement, 57 as an AVERAGE life expectancy does seem way too low--it implies either that half of CHP officers die when they are younger than 57, or that a significant percentage of CHP officers die in their 20s, and most of the remainder die in their late 50s or early 60s! :eek: Was this statistic based on an unusually hazardous year, or is there something unusually hazardous about CHP?

Has anyone here observed such a low life expectancy in their own law enforcement agencies?

valycop
06-22-06, 09:07 AM
Has anyone here observed such a low life expectancy in their own law enforcement agencies?

I started my career in 1975. Granted I've worked for a few agencies so I will focus on the Sheriff's Office I work for now. Since 1986 we have lost quite a few from various means, heart attacks, cancer and suicide.

Age COD
55 Cancer
51 Heart Attack
41 Suicide
56 Cancer
40 Suicide
42 Cancer
74 Cancer (retired)
58 Heart Attack

With the exception of one, everyone else was an active current employee. Now if you add in the near misses such as non-fatal heart attacks the list will climb dramatically.

Kind of sad really.

danninator
06-22-06, 12:23 PM
We were told in the academy average life expectancy was 57-59. Although l ike it was previously mentioned that's based on habits of some of the older officers. I'm careful about what I eat, don't smoke, only a casual drinker, and exercise regularly. Some guys sit in a car for 12 hours with very limited movement except to take a smoke break or grab some mcdonalds drive thru... that's what will kill you.

retdetsgt
06-22-06, 03:33 PM
“Retirement is tough for cops. Their average life expectancy after
retirement is five years, according to '91 FBI statistics.
Psychotherapist and former police officer Albert Seng says a number of
cops go through a grief process in disconnecting from "a lifestyle
rather than a job." Once you're out of it, you're really out of it.
You're on the outside.”

I believe that. That's exactly why I keep preaching that this is a job, not a lifestyle and you DON'T need to be ON 24-7. Far too many people get too much of their identity from the job and like the power it gives them way too much. Once they lose that power, they are just plain lost.

Smoking, drinking, etc definitely has a lot to do with it, but several of my peers have died before reaching 65. I've gone to their funerals. And everyone of them was one of those "24-7 cop" types. There's a hell of a lot more to this life than a job.

Several years before I retired, I started introducing myself to people on the job by giving my name and then saying, "I'm a police detective" rather than introducing myself as Det so and so or Sgt so and so. I also answered my phone with my name, not giving my rank or title. A small thing, but it did help me to start disassociating myself with the job. Then when I retired all I felt was relief.

Sphagnum
06-22-06, 05:00 PM
Thanks for the input guys, lots of good thoughts. It just amazed me when I heard the number....

It makes sense when one thinks about it, especially the "way things used to be that aren't anymore" factoring into the number....

It's not a number I felt like coming home and sharing with my wife, although I was dumb and left it out on a piece of paper that she saw anyway... hehe

Neobamboom
06-22-06, 05:52 PM
It's not a number I felt like coming home and sharing with my wife, although I was dumb and left it out on a piece of paper that she saw anyway... hehe

You should get negative rep for that one. :D


RetDetSgt, I have read others saying this as well. I'm already trying to get into the "it's not who I am, it's what I do" mentality, so that if/when I become a LEO I don't get the massive power trip. Based off of what you had said above that seems like a better reason to get into that mentality though. Good advice.

retdetsgt
06-22-06, 06:22 PM
It makes sense when one thinks about it, especially the "way things used to be that aren't anymore" factoring into the number....



Don't get too caught up in the "way things used to that aren't anymore". The same % of salemen, plumbers, truck drivers, etc. used to smoke, drink and so forth at the same rate as cops. And they don't die at such an low average age.

And I do believe the stress is higher now than it used to be. Depts didn't used to be nearly as PC and the media wasn't so much an attack dog 30 years ago as it is now.

And police management is every bit as bad now as it ever was. And that's the primary cause of stress in police officers.

retdetsgt
06-22-06, 06:28 PM
You gotta realize, the stats mentioned above are based on officers dying NOW that started working 20-30 years ago. Drinking, Smoking, Drugs etc. were all different vices that were regularly used to help LEOs to cope with the stresses and pains of the job. Don't get me wrong, we still have LEOs that indulge in there various vices today, but I don't think it is as prevalent.

Now we have, grief/crisis counselors/chaplains, stress leave, better forms of stress management, better equipment, more partners, more varied assignments. All of these things can help to reduce the daily stress level a LEO might endure throughout a 20-30 year career.

Back in the "day," (no offense RetDetSgt), it was a lot more run and gun, kick *** and take names, etc. Today, things are done differently for many obvious reasons, one being liberals, but you get the idea. Somebody back me up here...RetDet??

Does any of this make sense??

Some of it. As I just posted though, the same number of other occupations smoked, etc. I think it's the stress level and the mindset that kills people. The assignments are still pretty much the same as they've always been with the exception of gang units. People carry more devices on their belt, but cops used to be physically bigger though and didn't need all that stuff. At 6-2, 190 when I came on, I was little guy compared to most I worked around. And we had more two man cars then also. Not to mention video cameras weren't invented yet!:D

Frankly, all things factored in, I suspect the early death age will still be around when today's new cops retire.

cntryboy0531
06-22-06, 07:02 PM
Some of it. As I just posted though, the same number of other occupations smoked, etc. I think it's the stress level and the mindset that kills people. The assignments are still pretty much the same as they've always been with the exception of gang units. People carry more devices on their belt, but cops used to be physically bigger though and didn't need all that stuff. At 6-2, 190 when I came on, I was little guy compared to most I worked around. And we had more two man cars then also. Not to mention video cameras weren't invented yet!

Frankly, all things factored in, I suspect the early death age will still be around when today's new cops retire.


Probably.

Which is why when I go home in the morning.. I don't make traffic stops on my way home after End Of Shift. I rarely turn on my agency computer at home, only when I want to send a message to someone or check an E-mail if I'm waiting on something (like my paystub ). I pretty much just make every effort to leave my job in my car when I go home. The only reminder I carry is my gun and badge/id I carry around.

I might share a couple stories every now and then when asked.. But for the most part, I just don't talk about what happens at work. I enjoy my job, but I leave it in the car. :)

Oh, and the Sheriff still refuses to put camera's in our car. He still take's our word over a civillians or boss's. :D

Apollo8138
06-22-06, 07:59 PM
i f ound this lil tidbit...kinda outdated but scary nonetheless.

“Retirement is tough for cops. Their average life expectancy after
retirement is five years, according to '91 FBI statistics.
Psychotherapist and former police officer Albert Seng says a number of
cops go through a grief process in disconnecting from "a lifestyle
rather than a job." Once you're out of it, you're really out of it.
You're on the outside.”
Our T.A., who retired from Homicide a few years back, told us the same thing. Everyone in the classroom was in shock.

retdetsgt
06-22-06, 10:24 PM
Which is why when I go home in the morning.. I don't make traffic stops on my way home after End Of Shift. I rarely turn on my agency computer at home, only when I want to send a message to someone or check an E-mail if I'm waiting on something (like my paystub ). I pretty much just make every effort to leave my job in my car when I go home. The only reminder I carry is my gun and badge/id I carry around.



Good! You can tell from posts here and other LE forums that some people live and breathe police work. This is their whole and entire life. Odds are it's gonna catch up to them.

I've seen all kinds of rationalizations about why people need to be ON 24-7 and that's all they are, rationalizations. I think I can compare my lifetime record of arresting and getting convictions on dangerous felons to most people here. I was a cop in a fairly large city with a high crime rate. And I always worked areas where I would come in contact with them, both in uniform and as a detective. And after the newness of being a cop wore off, I really did my best to leave it at work and not even think of myself as a cop when I was out with my family, etc. To be honest, the only time I got worried was when I was investigating some cops on my dept for doing drugs.

And people tell me that I adapted to retirement better than anyone they knew!:D

cntryboy0531
06-23-06, 03:11 AM
Good! You can tell from posts here and other LE forums that some people live and breathe police work. This is their whole and entire life. Odds are it's gonna catch up to them.

I've seen all kinds of rationalizations about why people need to be ON 24-7 and that's all they are, rationalizations. I think I can compare my lifetime record of arresting and getting convictions on dangerous felons to most people here. I was a cop in a fairly large city with a high crime rate. And I always worked areas where I would come in contact with them, both in uniform and as a detective. And after the newness of being a cop wore off, I really did my best to leave it at work and not even think of myself as a cop when I was out with my family, etc. To be honest, the only time I got worried was when I was investigating some cops on my dept for doing drugs.

And people tell me that I adapted to retirement better than anyone they knew!

I don't care for being on 24/7. I've called in stuff before off duty, but it was something going on that I didn't want to get involved in. Called in a drunk driver when I was off duty, after my first day on the job. I carry a gun because we have *** loads of MS13 gangbangers around here and other people I don't particuarly care for (like an ex g/f :D ).

serbianblue
06-23-06, 06:46 AM
I think that main reason for LEO short life is STRES. Bed sleeping, drinking, smoking and insane food habits are quite regular in general population here in Serbia and in statistic life expectations for police officers are under general public.

I know police officers who retired 20 years ago, and they still live very active life. But been police officer in their times was something different than today. In those days police officer in former Yugoslavia was „untouchable“. Chances to be attacked or injured in line of duty was literally unexciting.

In the other hand my generation had wars, NATO intervention, Kosovo conflict where we lost a lot of our friends, police officers was killed on streets, massive riots…. And most of newly retired police officers dies in within 2 years after pension, and many never live long enough to be retired (few months ago colleague and good friend of mine dies from hart in 42). He didn’t know he had heart condition.

Hard way to make a living.

P.S. BTW what are grief/crisis counselors/chaplains, stress leave better forms of stress management…..:confused: