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Drew27k9
03-18-05, 12:08 PM
He wasn't pulled over on a highway or residential side street, but when he was arrested Tuesday, Ronald O. Ogembo had the telltale signs of a drunken driver: the smell of alcohol on his breath, bloodshot eyes and trouble keeping his balance, authorities said.

He acknowledged that he had been driving, too -- on the tarmac at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

Ogembo, who has twice been convicted of drunken driving-related offenses and whose license was revoked in January, works for Sky Chef, a caterer for major airlines.

His blood-alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit -- 0.235 percent when he was arrested Tuesday for driving a service van on the tarmac, according to charges filed Thursday in Hennepin County District Court.

A Northwest Airlines employee had alerted authorities to Ogembo's alleged intoxication.

Ogembo, 35, told officials he had two to three beers at home before work and said he had serviced an airplane the night he was arrested, the charges said.

Metropolitan Airport Commission spokesman Patrick Hogan said that he was unaware of the charges and that there have been no drunken driving arrests on the tarmac in his four years with the commission.

"Obviously we don't want anyone driving under the influence anywhere in the airport area, especially on the tarmac," he said.

Drivers must undergo training before being allowed on the tarmac and are granted access with a special badge, he said. There are about 1,400 takeoffs and landings at the airport daily.

Sky Chef representatives could not be reached for comment; they contract directly with each airline.

Court documents show a history of alcohol problems for Ogembo. In May, he was convicted in Hennepin County for refusing to submit to a sobriety test. He was convicted in January for drunken driving.

Ogembo was charged Thursday with first-degree driving while impaired and driving after cancellation of his license.

http://startribune.com/stories/462/5299655.html


DolphinTattoos
03-18-05, 12:27 PM
"Obviously we don't want anyone driving under the influence anywhere in the airport area, especially on the tarmac," he said.

Well that's good to hear, but what about working on those airplanes while drunk???


Ogembo, 35, told officials he had two to three beers at home before work and said he had serviced an airplane the night he was arrested, the charges said.